Showing 1–50 of 8557 results

A Crystal Age

A Crystal Age is a utopian novel written by W. H. Hudson, first published in 1887. The book has been called a “significant S-F milestone” and has been noted for its anticipation of the “modern ecological mysticism” that would evolve a century later. (Summary by Wikipedia)

Confessions of a Convert

Robert Hugh Benson was the youngest son of Edward White Benson, the Archbishop of Canterbury and his wife Mary. Benson was was a prolific and popular writer during his time, and in 1903 he became a prominent convert to the Roman Catholic Church from Anglicanism . In 1904 he was ordained a Catholic priest. This book is his personal story of his journey to the Catholic faith, containing comparisons between Catholicism and the Anglican religion. (Summary by Maria Therese)

Confessions of a Book-Lover

“I am of the company of book men who read simply for the love of it,” confesses E. Walter Walters, in this gently written tome. Walters documents his habit of “book fishing–” seeking and finding quality volumes in the discount binds at his booksellers, and as a connoisseur of wine might match varieties with courses, he matches his books with the contexts in which he reads them–in the garden, in the bedroom, with friends. He also provides a list of his favorite authors (mostly 19th century United Kingdom) and favorite books, as well as favorite characters from the books he has read, not in a way to impose his choices on other readers, but to share his own personal experiences. (summary by Dr. P. Gould)

The Confessions (Pusey translation)

The Confessions outlines Augustine’s sinful youth and his conversion to Christianity. It is widely seen as the first Western autobiography ever written, and was an influential model for Christian writers throughout the following 1,000 years, through the Middle Ages. It is not a complete autobiography, as it was written in his early 40s, and he lived long afterwards, producing another important work (City of God). It does, nonetheless, provide an unbroken record of his development of thought and is the most complete record of any single person from the 4th and 5th centuries. It is a significant theological work, featuring spiritual meditations and insights. It begins: “GREAT art Thou, O Lord, and greatly to be praised; great is Thy power, and Thy wisdom infinite. And Thee would man praise; man, but a particle of Thy creation; man, that bears about him his mortality, the witness of his sin, the witness, that ]Thou, O God, resistest the proud: yet would man praise Thee; he, but a particle of Thy creation. Thou awakes us to delight in Thy praise; for Thou madest us for Thyself, and our heart is restless, unless it repose in Thee.? (Summary from Wikipedia and Book I, Chapter I.)

Confessions (Outler translation)

Confessions (Latin: Confessiones) is the name of an autobiographical work, consisting of 13 books, by St. Augustine of Hippo, written between AD 397 and AD 398. Modern English translations of it are sometimes published under the title The Confessions of St. Augustine in order to distinguish the book from other books with similar titles, such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Confessions. (Summary by Wikipedia)

The Confession of a Child of the Century

In this autobiographic novel, an aging man reflects on his past. We are witness to the relationships he has along the way, his mistakes, and finally– in the most unexpected and honorable way– the sudden development of his belief in God. (Summary by Stav Nisser)

A Confession (Version 2)

Leo Tolstoy’s “A Confession,” written in 1882 shortly after a life-altering spiritual crisis, is a brutally sincere reflection on life, morality, and the nature of faith. Tolstoy describes in great detail the process by which he lost his faith in established Christian churches, the meaninglessness of wealth and fame, the agony of acute depression, and how he overcame misery and dread through personal study of the teachings of Jesus Christ. Along the way, he contrasts the artificial faith and arrogance of educated people with the genuine faith and humility of the Russian peasant. This work, and others of its ilk, were aggressively censored by the Tsarist regime and directly led to Tolstoy being excommunicated by the Russian Orthodox Church. Summary by Paul Rizik.

The Confession

Mary Roberts Rinehart is claimed to have invented the “Had I but known” mystery genre. When Agnes Blakiston rented the old parsonage at Miss Emily’s request she soon came to regret it. Was the house haunted? Did Miss Emily have a secret so terrible she would rather die than reveal it? To find the answers you will need to listen. (Summary by Annise)

The Conferences of John Cassian (Part I)

The Conferences were written by John Cassian at the request of Pope Leo. They document the conversations that Cassian had with the elders living in Scetis (the desert of Egypt), and about principles of the spiritual and ascetic life. The work would go on to be a classic for both the Western and Eastern monastic world, and would frequently be read at mealtimes. – Summary by ancientchristian

A Confederate Girl’s Diary

Sarah Morgan Dawson was a young woman of 20 living in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, when she began this diary. The American Civil War was raging. Though at first the conflict seemed far away, it would eventually be brought home to her in very personal terms. Her family’s loyalties were divided. Sarah’s father, though he disapproved of secession, declared for the South when Louisiana left the Union. Her eldest brother, who became the family patriarch when his father died in 1861, was for the Union, though he refused to take up arms against his fellow Southerners. The family owned slaves, some of whom are mentioned by name in this diary. Sarah was devoted to the Confederacy, and watched with sorrow and indignation its demise. Her diary, written from March 1862 to June 1865, discourses on topics as normal as household routines and romantic intrigues to those as unsettling as concern for her brothers who fought in the war. Largely self-taught, she describes in clear and inviting prose, fleeing Baton Rouge during a bombardment, suffering a painful spinal injury when adequate medical help was unavailable, the looting of her home by Northern soldiers, the humiliation of life under General Butler in New Orleans, and dealing with privations and displacement in a region torn by war. She was a child of her time and place. Her inability to see the cruelty and indignity of slavery grates harshly on the modern ear. Regardless of how one feels about the Lost Cause, however, Sarah’s diary provides a valuable historical perspective on life behind the lines of this bitter conflict. (Introduction by Christine Dufour)

The Conduct of Life

This is the best of Emerson’s later works, qualifying his earlier popular essays, series one and two, with the heavier hand of experience. The Conduct of Life ostensibly is a set of essays about how to live life, but also is an amalgam of what life taught Emerson. (Summary by Daniel Christopher June)

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels – St. Luke Vol. 2

?Expository Thoughts? divides the Gospels into sections of about twelve verses each, from which J. C. Ryle selects two or three prominent points to dwell on and bring to the reader?s attention. In Ryle?s day, there were many detailed commentaries and expositions on scripture. In writing these ?Expository Thoughts?, Ryle aimed to offer a resource to the laity for use in family prayers, as an aid to those who visit the sick and desire a proper book to read on such occasions, and for private devotions for those whose callings and engagements make it impossible for them to read large commentaries. This is the second of two volumes on St. Luke. As with the previous volumes on the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Mark, Rev. Ryle offered this book ?with an earnest prayer, that it may tend to the promotion of pure and undefiled religion, help to extend the knowledge of Christ, and be a humble instrument in aid of the glorious work of converting and edifying immortal souls.? (Introduction by MaryAnn) Books in this series: Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Matthew Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Mark Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 3

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels – St. Luke Vol. 1

?Expository Thoughts? divides the Gospels into sections of about twelve verses each, from which J. C. Ryle selects two or three prominent points to dwell on and bring to the reader?s attention. In Ryle?s day, there were many detailed commentaries and expositions on scripture. In writing these ?Expository Thoughts?, Ryle aimed to offer a resource to the laity for use in family prayers, as an aid to those who visit the sick and desire a proper book to read on such occasions, and for private devotions for those whose callings and engagements make it impossible for them to read large commentaries. This is the first of two volumes on St. Luke. As with the previous volumes on the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Mark, Rev. Ryle offered this book ?with an earnest prayer, that it may tend to the promotion of pure and undefiled religion, help to extend the knowledge of Christ, and be a humble instrument in aid of the glorious work of converting and edifying immortal souls.? (Introduction by MaryAnn) Books in this series: Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Matthew Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Mark Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 3

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels – St. John Vol. 3

The volume now in the reader’s hands completes a work which I began sixteen years ago, entitled “Expository Thoughts on the Gospels.” By the good hand of God that work is now finished. For this I desire to be deeply thankful. “Better the end of a thing than the beginning of it.” (Eccles. vii. 8.) I have now only to commend to my gracious God and Father this feeble attempt to explain a most glorious portion of His revealed Scripture. I do it with humble thankfulness, but with a sense of utter weakness before the power of His word, and of inability to sound the depth even of its simplest sentence. May he spare the hand which has been put forward to touch the ark! May He, for Christ’s sake, forgive all rashness, all perverseness, all uncharitableness, which may be found in this book! And may He sanctify it to the use of His Church: its truth, if any for teaching; its manifold defects for warning.” (From the Preface) Books in this series: Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Matthew Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Mark Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 3

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels – St. John Vol. 2

The fourteen years which have “passed over” me since I first began writing on the Gospels, I humbly hope have not been thrown away. They have been to me years of many trials, and I may add of much work, much reading, much reflection, and not a little prayer. At the end of these fourteen years, I feel more than ever convinced that what are called “Evangelical” views of Christian truth are thoroughly Scriptural views, and will bear the test of any fair investigation. The longer I live the more firmly I am persuaded that no system of divinity is so entirely in harmony with the Bible, as the system which rightly or wrongly is called “Evangelical.” I now send forth this volume with an earnest prayer that God may bless it and make it useful. Ignorance of Scripture, I feel more than ever, is the curse of these latter days. Men read many books, and yet neglect “the one Book.” If I can help to make the Bible more plain and interesting to any man’s soul, I shall be abundantly content. (From the Preface) Books in this series: Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Matthew Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Mark Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 3

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels – St. John Vol. 1

I send forth the volume now in the reader’s hands, with much diffidence, and a very deep sense of responsibility. It is a peculiarly serious undertaking to attempt a Commentary on the Gospel of St. John. This “Commentary” is so extensive that it occupies far more space than the “Expository Thoughts,” and is, I must honestly confess, the principal part of the work. To some it may appear far too long and full. But the circumstances of the times are mu justification. We live in a day of abounding vagueness and indistinctness on doctrinal subjects in religion. Now, if ever, it is the duty of all advocates of clear, well-defined, sharply-cut theology, to supply proof that their views are thoroughly borne out by Scripture. I have endeavoured to do so in this Commentary. I hold that the Gospel of St. John, rightly interpreted, is the best and simplest answer to those who profess to admire a vague and indistinct Christianity. (From the Preface) Books in this series: Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Matthew Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Mark Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. Luke, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 1 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 2 Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of St. John, Vol. 3

Expositions on the Book of Psalms Vol. 3 – Psalms 53-75

These sermons on the Psalms of the Holy Prophet and King David are as poetic as the Psalms themselves. They are well-suited for inspirational and devotional listening. – Summary by The Reader

Expositions on the Book of Psalms Vol. 2 – Psalms 37-52

These sermons on the Psalms of the Holy Prophet and King David are as poetic as the Psalms themselves. They are well-suited for inspirational and devotional listening. – Summary by The Reader

Expositions on the Book of Psalms Vol. 1

The Book of Psalms is commonly known as the Psalms or the Psalter, and is divided into five sections, each closing with a doxology. The title is derived from the Greek translation, ?????? (psalmoi) meaning “instrumental music” and, by extension, “the words accompanying the music”. Most if not all are thought be composed by King David. The Psalms have always been an integral part of the prayers of the Christian church and especially among monks, who would generally chant all psalms in a week-long cycle. There have been many commentaries on the Psalms, but none perhaps more famous and widely used than St. Augustine’s. This first volume covers the first section of Psalms (1 – 36). – Summary by ancientchristian

An Exposition upon the Song of the Blessed Virgin Mary called Magnificat

Luther’s 1521 exposition of the Magnificat was written for John Frederick I, Elector of Saxony (1503-1554), at that time a teenager. It was written in two parts, being interrupted by Luther’s appearance at the Diet of Worms. It is sermonic in form but written to be read rather than heard. – Summary by InTheDesert

Exposition of the Apostles’ Creed

Rev. James Dodds, D.D. was a noted religious writer, educated in Edinburgh, joining the Free Church, serving in Dunbar for most of his career. In this exposition, he writes primarily to a lay audience to make the fundamental beliefs of the Apostles’ Creed more accessible. Although he does not delve into the history of the development of the Creed, he draws from a wide body of reading, especially that of Martin Luther. – Summary by Larry Wilson

Explorers and Travellers

?Explorers and Travellers? is a collection of short biographies of some of America?s intrepid explorers. Adolphus W. Greely writes brief but very complete histories of men who risked life and fortune to discover more of our world. A thoroughly enjoyable work if you enjoy exploration and adventure. – summary by William Tomcho

An Explorer in the Air Service

Explorer Hiram Bingham discovered Machu Picchu in 1911, as recounted in his book Inca Lands, now released on LibriVox at http://librivox.org/inca-lands-by-hiram-bingham/. In 1917, he became an aviator and organized the United States Schools of Military Aeronautics at eight universities to provide ground school training for aviation cadets, and then in Issoudun, France, Bingham commanded the primary Air Service flying school. He became a supporter of the Air Service in their post-war quest for independence from the Army and supported that effort, in part, with the publication of this book of his wartime experiences published in 1920 by Yale University Press. (Summary by Wikipedia and ToddHW)

The Explorer

An early novel by W. Somerset Maugham about conflicting feelings of self-integrity, filial love, romantic love. Lucy Allerton and Alec MacKenzie have to choose between grasping happiness that is their due and upholding a set of moral values that define themselves. – Summary by Lilith Branda

The National Geographic Magazine Vol. 07 – 02. February 1896

The National Geographic Magazine, an illustrated monthly, the February Number. It includes the following articles: * Venezuela: Her Government, People, and Boundary, by William E. Curtis * The Panama Canal Route, by Robert T. Hill * The Tehuantepec Ship Railway, by Elmer L. Corthell * The Present State of the Nicaragua Canal, by Gen. A. W. Greely * Explorations by the Bureau of American Ethnology in 1895, by W. J. McGee * The Valley of the Orinoco, by T. H. Gignilliat * Yucatan in 1895 along with geographic literature and notes.

Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 035

Eighteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include how to swim, Navajo silversmithing, the sun, begonias and ferns, Martin Luther, U.S. Presidents Eisenhower and Nixon, Captain Cook’s exploration of Botany Bay, General James Wolfe, and Moravian missionaries in Labrador. (summary by Sue Anderson)

The Exploits of Juve (version 2)

The second book in the Fant?mas series by the prolific authors Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre (they published 32 Fant?mas novels between 1911 and 1913.) Fant?mas broke the mold of the Gentlemen burglars like Raffles and Arsene Lupin. He killed without compunction. His anarchic ruthlessness, especially as portrayed by silent film pioneer Louis Feuillade, made Fant?mas the darling of the French avante garde, such as the artist Ren? Magritte and novelist Robert Desnos. (Summary by Alan Winterrowd)

The Exploits of Juve

Fant?mas was introduced a few years after Ars?ne Lupin, another well-known thief. But whereas Lupin draws the line at murder, Fant?mas has no such qualms and is shown as a sociopath who enjoys killing in a sadistic fashion. He is totally ruthless, gives no mercy, and is loyal to none, not even his own children. He is a master of disguise, always appearing under an assumed identity, often that of a person whom he has murdered. Fant?mas makes use of bizarre and improbable techniques in his crimes, such as plague-infested rats, giant snakes, and rooms that fill with sand. The Exploits of Juve chronicles some of Juve?s adventures in pursuit of this master criminal and ends with what may be Fantomas? revenge on the detective. (Introduction by Wikipedia and Don Jenkins)

The Exploits Of Elaine

The Exploits of Elaine It tells the story of a young woman named Elaine who, with the help of a detective, tries to find the man, known only as “The Clutching Hand”, who murdered her father. (Wikipedia)

The Exploits of Brigadier Gerard

The hero, Etienne Gerard, is a Hussar in the French Army during the Napoleonic Wars. Gerard’s most notable attribute is his vanity – he is utterly convinced that he is the bravest soldier, greatest swordsman, accomplished horseman and gallant lover in all France. Gerard is not entirely wrong since he displays notable bravery on many occasions, but his self-satisfaction undercuts this quite often. Obsessed with honour and glory, he is always ready with a stirring speech or a gallant remark to a lady. (Introduction from Wikipedia)

The Exploits and Triumphs, in Europe, of Paul Morphy, the Chess Champion

Paul Morphy, born in New Orleans in 1837, was considered the greatest chess player of his era. He was a child prodigy who learned playing chess simply by watching family members play, and when he was only 9 years old, he was hailed as the best chess player in New Orleans. This book describes Morphy’s trip to Europe, i.e., England and France, where he wanted to play the European Champion Staunton, a match that never came about as the correspondence included in this book shows. He did play – and beat – virtually every other strong player in Europe though, and tales of these matches and people make up a large part of this book. After his triumphs in Europe, Paul Morphy was considered the unofficial World Chess Champion, as official championship tournaments were only held from 1886. Morphy retired from chess in 1859 in order to devote himself to his law practice. He died from a stroke in 1884. (Summary by Availle)

The Explanation of the Apocalypse

The Explanation of the Apocalypse by Ven. Beda is the earliest of the many works of our own writers on that Book, and, as such, may well deserve to appear in a form accessible to English readers. The chief characteristics of Beda’s method of exposition may be thus stated. The several visions are considered not to be successive, but contemporaneous, with occasional recapitulations and to represent the condition of the Church in all ages, under different aspects. The thousand years, in the twentieth chapter, are interpreted of the present period of the Church’s existence, in accordance with the opinion of St Augustine, in the second part of his De Civitate Dei. The ‘attention is closely directed to the text, and to corresponding passages of Holy Scripture, that the meaning of the symbolic language may be elicited. The previous exposition of Tichonius is mainly, but not exclusively followed. Beda appears, for example, to have adopted several opinions from St. Gregory the Great, and Frimasius, as well as St. Augustine. The date of the “Explanation” is circa. A.D. 710 ? 716. It is described by Beda as an “Exposition” but it is called an “Explanation” in the printed editions of his works. (Preface)

Explanation of Catholic Morals

A Concise, Reasoned, and Popular Exposition of Catholic Morals. The ten commandments, vice and virtue from the Catholic perspective. The contents of this volume appeared originally in The Catholic Transcript, of Hartford, Connecticut, in weekly installments, from February, 1901, to February, 1903.

The Explanation

LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 recordings of The Explanation by Rudyard Kipling. This was the Weekly Poetry project for November 1st, 2009.

Short Story Collection Vol. 084

And so we present the 84th Librivox Short Story Collection! Each tale is selected and read by a Librivox volunteer. Once again, we have a wide variety of stories, from the amusing to the perplexing. Zane Grey, Maxim Gorky and H.G. Wells are among the authors selected this time round.

Experiments in Plant Hybridisation

Gregor Mendel was an Augustinian monk in the St. Thomas monastery in Brno. His seminal paper “Experiments in Plant Hybridization” presents his results of studying genetic traits in pea plants. It is the ground breaking work on inheritance, being the first to differentiate between dominant and recessive genetic traits. His work was long ignored and deemed controversial, however, at its rediscovery at the turn to the 20th century, it earned Gregor Mendel the title “father of modern genetics”. (Summary by Availle)

Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air

Joseph Priestley, FRS was an 18th-century English theologian, Dissenting clergyman, natural philosopher, chemist, educator, and political theorist who published over 150 works. In ?Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air,? he reviews experiments with gases. A common theme in this work is measuring the volumes of gases held in glass tubes, and their increase or decrease when exposed to other substances. He also tests the effects of gases on mice, plants and insects. Priestley demonstrated that fixed air (now known as CO2) can be produced from several reactions including alcoholic fermentation, combustion and a mixture of oil of vitriol and chalk (sulfuric acid and calcium oxide). He also showed that it is soluble in water, and that its toxic effects can be reduced when agitated in water. In other experiments, he showed that combinations of gases can mix to form a smaller volume than the sum of both separate gases, as when he combined common air (atmospheric air) with nitrous air (nitric oxide, NO). For some experiments, Priestley tests whether the properties of gases change when stored. He finds that inflammable air (hydrogen, H2 or a mixture of hydrocarbons) becomes less flammable but retains its toxic properties. Also interested in electricity, Priestley tests the effects of gases on sparks. While he finds that gases are generally good insulators, he also finds that some gases change the colors of electric sparks. He also discovers that some mixtures of air explode in their entirety, while others must be combined with common air in order to burn. Priestley uses several terms common to the study of natural philosophy, or chemical experiments as known today. Some of the terms are parts of obsolete theories or are old names for chemicals now given standard names. To better understand Priestley’s observations, the following terms are defined according to their present names. here

The Experienced English Housekeeper

‘Cut a large old hare in small pieces, and put it in a mug with three blades of mace, a little salt, two large onions, one red herring, six morels, half a pint of red wine, three quarts of water, bake it in a quick oven three hours…’. English cooking at its best from eighteenth-century celebrity chef, Elizabeth Raffald. Born in Doncaster, Raffald worked for 15 years as housekeeper in great houses, including that of Lady Elisabeth Warburton at Arley Hall, Cheshire, before setting up as a confectioner and innkeeper in Manchester. The Experienced English Housekeeper was published in 1769 and ran to 13 editions. This reading is from the 10th edition (1786) and includes 900 recipes (or as listeners will discover, receipts). Vegetarians take note, some sections of this book contain large quantities of meat! (Summary by Phil Benson)

The Expedition of the Donner Party and its Tragic Fate

The Donner Party was a group of California-bound American settlers caught up in the “westering fever” of the 1840s. After becoming snowbound in the Sierra Nevada in the winter of 1846?1847, some of the emigrants resorted to cannibalism. Although this aspect of the tragedy has become synonymous with the Donner Party in the popular imagination, it actually was a minor part of the episode. The author was about 4 at the time. The first part of the book accounts the tragic journey and rescue attempts; the last half are reminiscences of the child orphan, passed from family to family while growing up. (Summary from Wikipedia & Tricia G)

The Expedition of Humphry Clinker

The Expedition of Humphry Clinker was the last of the picaresque novels of Tobias Smollett, and is considered by many to be his best and funniest work. Published in London on 17 June 1771, it is an epistolary novel, presented in the form of letters written by six different characters: Matthew Bramble, a Welsh Squire; his sister Tabitha; their niece and nephew, Jery and Lydia Melford; Tabitha’s maid Winifred Jenkins; and Lydia’s suitor, Wilson. Much of the comedy arises from differences in the descriptions of the same events by different participants. Attributions of motives and descriptions of behavior show wild variation and reveal much about the character of the teller. The setting, amidst the high-society spa towns and seaside resorts of the 18th century provides his characters with many opportunities for satirical observations on English life and manners. (Summary by Wikipedia)

Exotics and Retrospectives

Lafcadio Hearn, born 1850 in Greece, went to Japan when he was 40 years old and became a Japanese citizen only 6 years later. His writings about Japan from the beginning of the Meiji era, when the country was just opening to the West, remain among the most important explanations of Japanese culture. This book contains in the first part, “Exotics”, his observations of and personal insights into Japan. For example, Fuji no Yama tells about him climbing the highest mountain in Japan; and A Question in the Zen Texts, Literature of the Dead, and Of Moon Desire try to explain Buddhist teachings. In the second part, “Retrospectives”, Hearn leaves both Japan and his vantage point as impartial observer behind and delves into personal experiences and musings that occurred to him in the numerous countries he visited. The main topic of these very personal pieces is beauty in all its forms. (Summary by Availle)

The Consolation of Philosophy (Version 2)

The Consolation of Philosophy was written about 524 A.D. and has been called one of the most popular and influential books ever written. The book is presented as a dialogue between Boethius, the author, and Lady Philosophy, his tutor. Through her teaching, Boethius learns the true nature of fortune, misfortune, wealth, good, and evil. This dramatic reading is an attempt to present this wonderful work in an audio format while maintaining the dialogic structure of the work. (Devorah Allen) Cast List Boethius, the Narrator: Larry Wilson Philosophy: Devorah Allen Headings and Footnotes: KevinS

The Consolation of Philosophy

Consolation of Philosophy (Latin: Consolatio Philosophiae) is a philosophical work by Boethius written in about the year 524 AD. It has been described as the single most important and influential work in the West in medieval and early Renaissance Christianity, and is also the last great work that can be called Classical. Consolation of Philosophy was written during Boethius’ one year imprisonment while awaiting trial, and eventual horrific execution, for the crime of treason by Ostrogothic King Theodoric the Great. Boethius was at the very heights of power in Rome and was brought down by treachery. It was from this experience he was inspired to write a philosophical book from prison reflecting on how a lord’s favor could change so quickly and why friends would turn against him. It has been described as ?by far the most interesting example of prison literature the world has ever seen.? The Consolation of Philosophy stands, by its note of fatalism and its affinities with the Christian doctrine of humility, midway between the heathen philosophy of Seneca the Younger and the later Christian philosophy of consolation represented by Thomas Aquinas. The book is heavily influenced by Plato and his dialogues (as was Boethius himself). (Summary from Wikipedia)

Consolation

This Weekly Poem is taken from The Queens’ Garden – Poems by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and others. – Summary by David Lawrence

The Consolation

LibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of The Consolation by Anne Bront?. This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 14th, 2010.

Considerations on Representative Government

Mill’s volume was published in 1861 as an argument favoring this form of governance. Mill covers what forms of government work best, including when representative government is applicable and when not. He details appropriate functions of representative bodies and warns of problems to avoid. He distinguishes between true and false democracy. Other areas covered include how voting is carried out, the role of a second chamber in Parliament, and how an executive branch might function. (Summary by Bill Boerst)

Consider the Lilies of the Field

LibriVox volunteers bring you 14 recordings of Consider the Lilies of the Field by Christina Rossetti. This was the Weekly Poetry project for August 1, 2021. —— Rossetti began writing down and dating her poems from 1842, most of which imitated her favored poets. In 1847 she began experimenting with verse forms such as sonnets, hymns and ballads while drawing narratives from the Bible, folk tales, and the lives of saints. (Summary by Wikipedia)

Consequences

Set in late Victorian England, ?Consequences? follows the life of Alexandra Clare, a girl born into an upper class Catholic London family. Raised from birth for the privileged life of a wife and mother, Alexandra never quite fits in with her or her family?s expectations and fails at seemingly everything she tries ? school, the marriage market, family life.

The Conscious Lovers

As early as 1720 Steele spoke in the Theatre of “a friend of mine” who was lately preparing a comedy according to the just laws of the stage, and had introduced a scene in which the first character bore unprovoked wrong, denied a duel, and still appeared a man of honour and courage. This was clearly an allusion to the play eventually to be published as The Conscious Lovers. – Summary by G. A. Aitken. Cast list: Sir John Bevil: ToddHW Mr. Sealand: Algy Pug Bevil, Junior., in love with Indiana: Adrian Stephens Myrtle, in love with Lucinda: Adam Bielka Cimberton, a Coxcomb: alanmapstone Humphry, an old Servant to Sir John: Larry Wilson Tom, Servant to Bevil, Junior: Tomas Peter Daniel, a Country Boy, Servant to Indiana: Arthur Nascimento Mrs. Sealand, second Wife to Sealand: Sonia Isabella, Sister to Sealand: Kathryn Phipps Indiana, Sealand’s Daughter, by his first Wife: Rapunzelina Lucinda, Sealand’s Daughter, by his second Wife: Devorah Allen Phillis, Maid to Lucinda: TJ Burns Servant: Leanne Yau Stage Directions: MichaelMaggs Edited by: ToddHW

The Conscientious Deacon

LibriVox volunteers bring you 14 recordings of The Conscientious Deacon by Vachel Lindsay. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 5th, 2013. Vachel Lindsay described this poem as “a song to be syncopated as you please”. According to Wikipedia he is considered the father of modern singing poetry (as he referred to it) in which verses are meant to be sung or chanted. His extensive correspondence with the poet Yeats details his intentions to revive the musical qualities in poetry as had been practised by the ancient Greeks. (Introduction by Ruth Golding)